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Why this popular move could be the reason for your unwanted snap hook

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There is no ideal way to swing a golf club, which is both a great and frustrating fact. The golf swing of each professional is a little bit unique. It all relies on the specific strengths and limitations of your body. You could hit poorer strokes as a result of something that is one player’s strongest golf swing strength.

Using a bent or bowed wrist at the top of your backswing and downswing is one of these techniques that has grown especially popular in recent years. At the height of their swings, Viktor Hovland, Dustin Johnson, Jon Rahm, and Collin Morikawa all have noticeably bent wrists, which has aided each of them in becoming excellent ball strikers.

The majority of golfers flex their lead wrist in some way, and you probably do too. But, the key to make this maneuver work for you is to combine a lot of body movement with your downswing.

“Your lead wrist is your swing’s steering wheel, but your body remains the engine. The engine can never stall, because stalling may produce a hook,” Dahlquist writes.

And for that reason, according to Reed Howard, co-host of Play Smart and certified TPI coach, golfers should be cautious about attempting to purposefully seek more of it, particularly if they lack the mobility to rotate or have trouble producing enough clubhead velocity. Those two factors could result in “terrible” shots.

“You will not have enough speed to get the ball off the ground. You won’t be able to hit a long iron well, you won’t be able to hit your driver well, because you may not have the rotational speed to make this kind of golf swing work,” he says.

This maneuver isn’t always good or bad; it only depends on your physical limitations. The most important thing, according to Howard on his podcast, is to locate a competent coach who can work with you to discover the swing that works best for your body. Along the way, you’ll save yourself some headaches.

Original article posted on Golf.com

Photo credit: 19thgreengolf.com

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